Apply for a work visa, what are the steps?

What are the steps to apply for a work visa in the United States? What are the types of work visa? What is the best work visa for you? If you have come this far it is because you are interested in the subject and do not know how to proceed. Don’t worry, we have all the necessary information regarding the steps to apply for a work visa in the United States.

Working in the United States can be the dream of many people; However, if you want to apply for a work visa, you should know what types of visa exist and the steps to apply for a work visa in the United States, at the same time that you may need the help of an immigration lawyer to support you. during your application process.

Types of work visa and their requirements

H-1B (specialty occupation)

If you are coming to the United States to provide services in a scheduled professional job then this type of visa is for you. You must have a bachelor’s or higher degree (postgraduate or doctorate) in the specialty for which you are applying. USCIS will determine if your employment constitutes your particular specialty and if you are qualified to provide this type of service. Your employer will need to submit a job application and stop by an office for officials to review the documentation.

H-1B1 (treaty-based temporary work visas)

Free trade agreements signed with Chile and Singapore allow Chilean and Singaporean citizens to work temporarily in the United States under certain conditions. Only citizens of these nationalities may apply for this type of visa. Applicants must have a job offer from an employer in their specialty area, pass the medical review, and complete the visa process.

H-2A (seasonal agricultural workers)

This visa allows employers in the United States to hire foreign nationals to fill temporary agricultural positions for which there is no labor available in the United States. An H-2A visa applies to you if you seek to provide services in the agricultural sector on a temporary or seasonal basis in the United States. A United States employer will need to file a Form I-129 for you with the appropriate entity for review.

H-2B visa (skilled and unskilled workers)

If you plan to travel to the United States for temporary or seasonal work for which there are not enough workers in the United States, this visa is for you. Your employer must present a certification from the Department of Labor confirming that there are not enough qualified workers for the type of work for which you are participating.

H-3 (training)

The H-3 visa applies to you if you go to the United States to receive training from an employer in any sector except education or postgraduate training, for a period of up to two (2) years. The training may not be available in your home country and it will not be able to provide productive work either.

H-4 (dependents)

If you are the main beneficiary of an H visa, your spouse or children (under 21 years of age) may receive an H-4 visa to accompany you to the United States during your time of stay. However, they will not have permission to work.

L-1 (intra-company transfer)

If you are an employee of an international company that is temporarily transferring you to the headquarters in the United States, this visa is for you. To qualify for an L-1 visa you must have specialized knowledge and be assigned to a position at the headquarters in the United States, although it does not have to be the same position you currently work in. In addition to this, you must have worked in the company continuously for at least one (1) year prior to your application.

L-2 (dependents)

If you are the main beneficiary of an L visa, your spouse or children (under 21 years of age) may apply for this type of visa to accompany you. Due to a recent change in the law, your spouse will be able to apply for authorization to work and enter the United States on their own L-2 visa; however, your children will not be allowed to work in the United States with this visa.

O (extraordinary abilities)

This type of visa is for people with extraordinary ability in science, arts, education, business or athletics; likewise, for people with extraordinary abilities in film and television production, together with their support staff.