Grounds for deportation in the United States

1. Causes involving marriage fraud (marrying for papers)

If you get married to fix your papers, you are committing marriage fraud. If you do this to avoid deportation, it is called a “marriage of convenience” and it could be one of the causes that lead to your removal from the country.

2. Causes involving drug trafficking

If you are the active member of a criminal organization, being involved in the illegal manufacture or transport of narcotics (including marijuana), you can be reported by the authorities and deported.

3. Causes related to violent crimes

If you have a serious criminal record such as sexual assault, domestic violence, armed assault, and other similar crimes, you risk immediate deportation.

3. Causes related to violent crimes

If you have a serious criminal record such as sexual assault, domestic violence, armed assault, and other similar crimes, you risk immediate deportation.

4. Causes related to sexual crimes

If you have a criminal conviction for sexual assault, pedophilia, or child abuse and have not served the entire sentence (for example, if you are on probation), you could be deported. This is even more true if he was arrested two (2) times during the same judicial period as the various charges that were brought against him.

5. Causes related to documentation

The authorities can discover your situation if you try to enter the United States with a false or illegal passport. Likewise, if you are undocumented, it is much easier to be deported than if you have a Green Card. In this case, the causes can vary from assuming the identity of another immigrant to obtain social benefits illegitimately to not complying with laws and regulations regarding work. If your immigration status were discovered, you could be expelled from the country without contemplation or exceptions.

6. Causes related to money or the economy

If you are a foreign citizen who has committed fraud, for example if you are accused of undeclared imports and tax evasion, you can be deported even if you are a legal resident of the United States for many years. If this cause is added to other serious crimes, they can make their situation imminently dangerous for the undocumented person.

7. Causes involving a criminal conviction

If you have been convicted of any crime, including rape or murder, you could be deported. This also applies to those immigrants with lesser criminal records.

8. Causes related to terrorism

Again, if you have a serious criminal and terrorist history, you can become a prime target for US immigration authorities; however, this type of causation is difficult to prove as the authorities are not required to share the details.

9. Causes related to identity

Again, if you try to enter the United States under a false name or have your original document stolen in an attempt to obtain political asylum, and if this is discovered, you could be deported for fraud.

10. Causes that involve accepting to be a protected witness

If you have a serious criminal record and become a witness, this can become the first cause of deportation for undocumented immigrants. If testimony is not necessary (for example because you have already been convicted), it may depend on the case and the circumstances if there are legal consequences for your immigration status; however, depending on the case, most undocumented immigrants are deported when they agree to be a protected witness.

The grounds that can lead to deportation are numerous and varied. Depending on the case, an undocumented person could be expelled or not, but it is important to be well informed about the consequences of each situation in order to have a clear idea of ​​the risk and to choose the most appropriate and legal path.

If you are not sure that you are committing any of these crimes or need legal advice to regulate your immigration status in the country, do not hesitate to contact us at (909)319-7103 / 1 (800) 559-7170, visit us at 228 West C Street Ontario CA 91762 or contact us by clicking here.

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